TICTeC Local 2019

Exploring Civic Tech in Local Communities

Friday November 1 2019, City Hall, London

The annual conference that focuses directly on the use of Civic Tech in communities and local government.

On 1st November 2019, mySociety hosted the second TICTeC Local event at City Hall in London. The event bought together 140 local government representatives, CSOs, practitioners, academics, private sector representatives and researchers from across the UK and beyond. Thank you to all who came.

Read our wrap-up report for a summary of this fantastic event.

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Conference resources

Speakers included

  • Miriam Levin

    Head of Community Action and Giving at the Office for Civil Society

    DCMS

  • Vidhya Alakeson

    CEO

    Power to Change

  • Sian Berry

    Co-leader / Camden Councillor

    Green Party

  • Graham Smith

    Professor of Politics and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy

    Westminster University

  • Tim Hughes

    Director

    Involve

  • Alasdair Roxburgh

    Director of Communities and Networks

    Friends of the Earth

Agenda

London’s Living Room, City Hall, London, SE1 2AA.

Friday 1st November 2019.

  • Conference registration & refreshments

    Please arrive in enough time to go through the security check at City Hall. This includes going through a metal detector and having all bags scanned.
  • Opening words

    • Mark Cridge (Chief Executive, mySociety)
    • Theo Blackwell (Chief Digital Officer for London)
  • mySociety research: evidence and impact

    • Dr Rebecca Rumbul (Head of Research, mySociety)
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)
    Presentation slides
  • What role can digital technologies play in citizen participation?

    Panel discussion.

    • Miriam Levin (Head of Community Action and Giving at the Office for Civil Society, DCMS)
    • Eva O’Brien (Delivery Manager, FutureGov)
    • Graham Smith (Professor of Politics and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Westminster University)
    • Tim Hughes (Director, Involve)
    • Moderator: Louise Crow (Head of Development, mySociety)
    Citizen participation processes like Citizens’ Assemblies are a modern solution — so shouldn’t digital technologies play a key part in their implementation? Speakers take an honest look at what tech can do for citizen participation… and what it can’t.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)
  • Refreshment break

    Please allow enough time to get from the Living Room to Committee Room 4 - you will need to take the lift to the lower ground floor and it takes around 10 minutes!.
  • Data changes everything: informed public services

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    The impact of data-enabled innovation in local public services in the UK

    • James Maddison (Open Data Institute)
    Presentation slides

    Beyond open data: how the Housing Data Coalition develops actionable, community-centered services

    • Georges Clement (JustFix)
    Presentation slides

    Click to engage: creating active citizens through digital technologies

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    Civic Tech to empower democracy and increase civic engagement: Local examples from the US

    • Tammy Esteves (Troy University)
    Presentation slides

    The impacts of Civic Tech for elections in the UK

    • Joe Mitchell (Democracy Club)
    Presentation slides
  • Time to walk between breakout rooms

    Please allow enough time to get between the Living Room and Committee Room 4 if you choose to - this takes around 10 minutes!
  • Earlier actions & better connections: technology combatting social problems

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    Using machine learning to identify food bank dependency early

    • Giselle Cory (DataKind)
    • Lucy Rimmington (DataKind)
    Presentation slides

    Digital tools to connect those facing homelessness with the support they need

    • Chris Hildrey (ProxyAddress)

    Showing the way: support with the digital transformation process

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    How GOV.UK Common Platforms are helping local authorities transform services for their residents

    • Laura Payten (Government Digital Service)
    Presentation slides

    Creating a cross-local government user research plan

    • Richard Smith (Hackney Council)
    • Sam Whitlock (Hackney Council)
    • Mirabai Galati (Croydon Council)
    Presentation slides
  • Standing buffet lunch

  • Better foresight: Civic Tech for the urban planners

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    Automating environmental impact analyses to improve urban planning in New York City

    • Jonathan Pichot (NYC Planning Labs)
    Presentation slides

    What user reported problems can and can’t tell us: Exploring FixMyStreet data

    • Alex Parsons (mySociety)

    Bringing the citizens in: Civic Tech for engagement and participation

    2 × 20 minute presentations, followed by 10 minute Q&A.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)

    Creating a live map of empty commercial spaces in London & findings from ‘Act Local: Empowering London's neighbourhoods' research

    • Jo Corfield & Joe Wills (Centre for London)
    Presentation slides

    Enabling local people to participate in the design of civic and public life

    • Gail Ramster (Royal College of Art)
    • Mike Saunders (Commonplace)
  • Time to reconvene in Living Room (9th floor)

  • Taking Back Control: Why community power matters to our economy and society and what gets in its way

    • Vidhya Alakeson (CEO, Power to Change)
    The session will explore the positive economic and social benefits of communities taking power and highlight examples of how this is happening in different communities across England, including community business, resident-led regeneration and community-led health and well being. It will identify a number of barriers to more communities exercising power, from policy to finance to the capacity of communities themselves.
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)
    Presentation slides
  • So you've declared a Climate Emergency. Now what?

    Panel discussion.

    • Sian Berry (Co-leader / Camden Councillor, Green Party)
    • Emily Tulloh (Service Designer, FutureGov)
    • Trewin Restorick (CEO/Founder, Hubbub)
    • Alasdair Roxburgh (Director of Communities and Networks, Friends of the Earth)
    Collaborative hackpad (please feel free to add your notes of the session to this.)
  • Closing remarks

  • Finish

Sponsors

Thank you to Theo Blackwell, London's Chief Digital Officer, for hosting TICTeC Local at City Hall.

mySociety is a charity and relies on sponsorship and ticket sales to make events like TICTeC and TICTeC Local happen. If you're interested in sponsoring the next TICTeC Local please contact Gemma Moulder.

FAQs

What is Civic Tech?

The field of Civic Tech is growing across the globe, often at a grassroots level — and yet, to those outside its network, the term can be unfamiliar. You will often see ‘Civic Tech’ mentioned along with sister buzzwords like ‘smart cities’, ‘e-gov’, ‘govtech’, ‘ICT4D’ and ‘Tech For Good’, to name but a few.

Civic Tech embraces all digital tools that enable citizens to easily and effectively engage with civic life, whether that is reporting an issue to a local authority, engaging with elected representatives or monitoring the use of community assets.

At its most effective, Civic Tech can save lives, protect environments, and mobilise citizen task forces in times of crisis. At a useful if less dramatic level, it can save time and money for governments, improve neighbourhoods and keep residents informed.

Civic Tech is often — but not exclusively — built by non-profit organisations working for a better, more representative, democratic or functional society. The result is often open source ‘tech for good’ software that is free or cheap to implement.

Is TICTeC Local for me?

If you’re interested in or work with digital technologies to improve local communities and their public authorities, then yes.

TICTeC Local will have a range of speakers covering a wide range of topics relevant to participation, efficiency, customer service, digital, information services and general governance.

What happens at TICTeC Local?

  • Practitioners, researchers and representatives showcase inspiring Civic Tech tools and projects that service local communities in the UK and beyond, with discussions on what makes them work and how
  • A chance to take stock of the Civic Tech landscape in the UK and what barriers there are to its progress
  • Panels and discussions around Civic Technology projects: the ethics, finances, and other practicalities of their implementation
  • Practical takeaways that you can take back and implement in your own strategies

Return to this page to see the agenda as it is finalised.

What will I get from TICTeC Local?

You will not get sales pitches, technical talk that only experts could understand, or high-concept presentations with no relevance to your own daily work.

TICTeC Local aims to build a bridge between the people that make digital tools for the public good, the people that use them and the people that examine their impact.

We believe that too often digital tools are built in isolation from the organisations that buy them, and the citizens that use them, and because of this everyone’s experience is the poorer.

At TICTeC Local, we’ll change that and bring down some of those barriers to discuss what really works. You will leave inspired by some of our showcased projects, you’ll have a better understanding of the most effective digital tools, and you’ll have met interesting people who are on a similar journey, or who might be able to help you in developing your digital capacity in the future.